SCHEDULE

We have scheduled our Programs dividing them into Day 1, Day 2, Day 3 in order to make it convenient for you to attend in absolute comfort.

25 Jan
Day 1

Keynote 1
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Biography:

Sarit Rashkovits completed Ph.D. in organizational behavior from the Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, Faculty of Industrial Engineering and Management. Sarit Rashkovits is working as a lecturer in the Max Stern Academic College of Emek Yezreel, Healthcare systems Management (Graduate and Undergraduate programs). Recently Sarit Rashkovits won the Best Non-European Paper Award a research of mine for the paper "Personality Attributes and Leadership Self-Efficacy of Health Systems Management Graduate Program Students" in the European Health Management Association 2019, Annual Conference, Espoo, Finland.

Abstract:

Since the publication of the prominent report "To Err is Human" (Institute of Medicine, 1999), scholars have emphasized the importance of learning from errors as a strategy for improving quality of care (e.g. Vogus et al. 2010). Based on the value of teamwork in healthcare (Bohmer, 2013; D'Amour et al, 2008; Manser, 2009; Kalisch, & Lee, 2010), the current lecture concentrates on a team level process, namely, an ongoing team process of reflecting on outcomes of actions, initiating changes in teamwork strategies, and experimenting with them (Edmondson, 1999, 2007).

Keynote 2
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Biography:

Rhian Sharp is the founder and CEO of Sharp Medical Recruiting and Consulting. Rhian has been an HR Leader for almost 20 years and a Healthcare leader for over 16 years (working with industry leading companies like McKesson and Gentiva). In 2009 Rhian was named the first HR Director for the newly created state agency DBHDD the agency consisted of the 7 behavioral health hospitals in the state of Georgia.   

Abstract:

In this presentation the audience will learn about some of the staffing challenges facing healthcare organizations in the US.  Ms Sharp will aslo share solutions for keeping healthcare workers.  You will learn about ways to recruit, motivate, compensation and retain your best healthcare workers.  You will also learn about the management styles that work best.

Keynote 3
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Biography:

Margaret I. Fitch completed her Ph.D. at the University of Toronto. She holds the positions of Head of Oncology Nursing and Supportive Care and Director of the Patient and Family Support Program at the Odette Cancer Centre and is associate Professor (Faculty of Nursing) and Professor (School of Graduate Studies) at the University of Toronto. She maintains an active research program in supportive care and publishes regularly. She is expert lead for the patient reported outcomes/survivorship at the Canadian partnership against cancer. She is also a past president of the International Society of Nurses in Cancer Care.

Abstract:

Accreditation bodies in the USA, the UK, and Europe have mandated that jurisdictions regularly screen patients for distress. Recent reports suggest that facilities struggle to overcome implementation barriers. In Canada, a Screening for Distress (6th vital sign) Initiative was implemented in eight cancer treatment facilities in seven provinces. With national support and coordination from the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer, the Initiative’s ultimate goal was to provide timely and appropriate response to cancer patients’ distress to improve the patient experience. The implementation included the application of evidence-informed tools by trained health care professionals to identify distress, facilitate intervention or referral, and enhance collaboration among health care providers to meet patient needs. Implementations have expanded in these facilities since the launch of the initiative and the success of this programmatic approach in Canada may assist other jurisdictions with successful implementation of Screening for Distress (6th vital sign).

Keynote 4
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Biography:

Prof JMMathibe-Neke is an Associate Professor at the University of South Africa (UNISA). She received a PhD with the university of the Witwatersrand and a Master on Medicine Degree in Bioethics and Health Law from the university of the Witwatersrand. Further holds a Master’s Degree in Midwifery from the University of Johannesburg. Obtained a Bachelor’s Degree and an Honours Degree from UNISA.  A Diploma in General Nursing and a Diploma in Midwifery. She is currently a lecturer in Ethics and supervising 11 Doctoral students and 1 Master student in Women’s Health and Midwifery with 11 Masters and 6 Doctoral graduated students.  

 

Abstract:

The general purpose of the pilot project was to raise the midwives’ awareness of psychosocial care during pregnancy, to fill the gap that exist in routine antenatal care and to improve the use of psychosocial services. A psychosocial risk assessment tool was administered in randomly selected Community Health Centres that provides antenatal care in Gauteng Province, South Africa.

Speaker 1
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Biography:

Dr. Mustafa YILDIZ was born in Istanbul in 1989. Elementary and high school education made in the various provinces of Turkey. In 2007, he entered Trakya University Faculty of Medicine. He graduated in 2013 and started his assistant education at Trakya University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Family Medicine. After leaving this department, he entered the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Okmeydani Training and Research Hospital in Health Sciences University in 2015 and became an Obstetrics and Gynecologist by completing his assistant education in 2019. He currently works at Bartin State Hospital.

 

Abstract:

Gastrointestinal system (GIS) malignancy with pregnancy is a very rare condition and is not common outside Japan. The incidence is between 0.025 - 0.1% for each pregnancy. GIS malignancies are diagnosed late in pregnancy and detected at an advanced stage. The most common cause of this condition is that the symptoms such as vomiting, nausea, loss of appetite and abdominal growth are mistaken with pregnancy and malignancy is overlooked. Especially in the second trimester, symptoms such as nausea and vomiting, weight loss, melena, hematemesis and deep anemia should suggest malignancy. Upper GIS endoscopy and colonoscopy are the recommended screening methods in these patients, especially in the third trimester. 

Speaker 2
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Biography:

Mr. James Bush, a Licensed Professional Counselor in the State of Tennessee. He completed his M.A. in Clinical Mental Health Counseling from Argosy University. He is the Program Director of Youth Overcoming Drug Abuse. For years, his efforts have concentrated on the growing adolescent population within the Middle Tennessee area and surrounding counties, which has led to service through community events, and partnerships with various organizations. He has also provided trainings for many audiences, on the topics of sexual violence prevention, alcohol and drug abuse trends, anxiety relief, deep-breathing techniques, and Adverse Childhood Experiences.    

Abstract:

It is reported that 1 in 4 women report having experienced some sexual violence as oppose to their male counterparts who experience 1 in 6. Needless to say, Sexual Violence is a huge problem within our society. The after effects of this trauma have been linked to depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety, hypersexuality, low self-esteem and low self-worth. Unfortunately, research suggest that trauma that is not treated can become chronic. To further this idea, an experience such as sexual violence that is not buffered by key social supports may create toxic stress within the brain. This falls in line with the research of Adverse Childhood Experiences and Building Strong Brains. Which demonstrates that experiences, actions, and thoughts are recorded in the neurons of the brain during developement. It also suggest that experiences that are most prevalent are most lasting within the brain even after it begins to prune the neurons around  the age of 14.

Speaker 3
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Biography:

Dr. Dalhatu Umaru Sangari was elected Senator for the Taraba South constituency of Taraba StateNigeria at the start of the Nigerian Fourth Republic, running on the All People's Party  

Abstract:

The burden of tobacco addiction on youth development in Nigeria continues to grow with significant impact on health and major social, human rights and economic consequences in all countries of the world, with  Nigeria being the third leading country among low income settings.  Globally, tobacco addiction has been estimated to be much higher in men within their reproductive ages as oppose to their relative cohort.

Speaker 4
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Biography:

Nellie Naranjee, KwaZulu Natal College of Nursing, Pietermaritzburg, Durban, South Africa; and, Department of Nursing, Durban University of Technology, Durban, South Africa

Abstract:

To explore the financial management roles of Nurse Managers in their current work environments, identify financial management development needs necessary for Nurse Managers practice and ultimately to develop a financial management framework to improve the skills of Nurse Managers.

Speaker 5
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Biography:

Eda Gorbis, PhD, LMFT, is a world-renowned authority on the treatment and research of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). From 1999 and until 2014 Dr. Gorbis held an appointment of Assistant Clinical Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the UCLA School of Medicine. She trained under Dr. Edna B. Foa, an internationally recognized authority who pioneered the protocols of Exposure Response Prevention (ERP) Therapy and Prolonged Exposure (PE) methods. She also worked with Dr. Jeffery Schwartz at UCLA, who was responsible for creating the 4-Step Cognitive-Behavioral Self-Treatment plan. She successfully synthesized these methods, along with Cognitive Behavioral Therapy to establish, develop, and direct the Westwood Institute for Anxiety Disorders, Inc. As clinical director, she personally works with each patient that enters the Intensive Outpatient Program for OCD treatment.

Abstract:

Excoriation disorder or skin picking disorder (SPD) is a chronic mental illness. It is defined by recurrent skin picking, scratching, rubbing and digging or urges to do so that goes on for extended periods of time, resulting in skin lesions and behaviour that interferes with functioning in other areas of life. Repeated attempts have been made to decrease or stop skin picking but were not successful. The skin-picked area of the body can be smooth and healthy, and the anomaly invisible to the naked eye. Commonly, individuals with SPD seek aesthetic procedures to address perceived self-defects or to remedy their self-inflicted scarring. It is important for aesthetic practitioners to identify SPD because continuing with aesthetic interventions could worsen the illness for the sufferer. In response to this issue, aesthetic practitioners can identify individuals with SPD by administering a screening questionnaire and appropriately providing referrals to mental health professionals. Empirically backed, specialised treatment, such as cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), habit reversal therapy (HBT), exposure and response prevention (ERP) and medication management have been found to be effective in treating SPD.

Speaker 6

Stella Underwood

University Hospitals of North Midlands ,United Kingdom

Title: Evaluating the impact of a coaching pilot on students and staff

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Biography:

I qualified as a staff nurse in 2005 having obtained a BSc in adult nursing. After qualifying I worked in trauma orthopaedics before becoming a Clinical Placement Facilitator in 2014. My role as Clinical Placement Facilitator is to support student nurses in clinical practice and to collaborate with partner Universities to ensure students receive optimal learning in supportive clinical environments. I completed an MSc in Advancing Professional practice at Keele University in 2018

Abstract:

A coaching pilot was developed following the publication of a number of reports that recommended a review into how student nurses are taught in clinical practice.  A bespoke version of the Collaborative Learning in Practice( CLiP) model was developed, which used both coaching and peer learning to encourage students to lead on the delivery of care for a designated group of patients.

A senior student led a team consisting of a further two junior students and they were given the responsibility of directing and coordinating the team in the manner expected of a registered nurse. A qualified nurse was responsible for the supervision of the students and used a coaching approach to teach. Findings from an evaluation revealed that the students benefitted from being able to work autonomously and were able to enhance their leadership and management skills.

Speaker 7
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Biography:

Helen is a Public Health Higher Degree Reserch candidate at the Latrobe University. She obstained her bachelor’s of Nursing and Midwifery from university of Swaziland and a master’s degree in public health from University of Venda in South Africa. Helen has been proactive with continuous learning and development in all facets of life. With a balance of academic and research experiences, she has work as a tuitor and research assistance in higher institutions. Helen has published more than 10 papers in the field of nursing, midwifery, adolescent health, women’s health, alcohol and substance use, sexual harassment etc. 

Abstract:

Maternal alcohol or other drug use during pregnancy is associated with a range of adverse health outcomes for mothers and their unborn child. The antenatal period presents an opportunity for health professionals to offer routine screening for alcohol or other drugs, to then provide intervention and referral for treatment and/or specialised support services. However, literature indicates that limited screening practices currently exist in maternity care settings. This study aim to identify barriers to screening pregnant women for alcohol or other drugs in maternity care settings, from the perspectives of healthcare professionals.

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